John, Author at Siren Comms_
blog_

What is a lifestyle brand?

Lifestyle brands; the ones that inspire a way of life, stimulate us to live, breathe, consume and develop our personal aesthetics in a certain way. These are the brands that successfully go beyond offering a functional product or service and become an integral part to achieving a desired way of living life.

When such a brand makes the decision to recruit the talents of a PR, it is crucial for said PR to understand what the lifestyle is that they are selling prior to charging forward with media communications. This is just as important as understanding the functionality of the product or service in question.


Living the lifestyle

Examples of lifestyles that brands may represent and inspire an audience with are the adventurous ones focused on exploring or taking risks, ones that are structured around sustainable living or perhaps it’s championing feminism. In most cases, it is usually a way of life that connects individuals to what they believe is the best version of themselves.

Taking the time to understand this is what will give PRs direct access to the community of people dedicating themselves to that way of life and as a result, will buy into the products or services that the brand is selling. The goal will be to position the product or service as being a crucial tool for achieving this lifestyle. Spending time observing, speaking to and researching the communities’ social preferences and behaviours is a great way to start this analysis.

A PR should always ask the following questions:

What does this audience long for from travel, food, drink and fashion experiences?

Which public figures inspire them and why?

How do they like to spend their money?

What causes do they support?



Lifestyle touch-points
for PRs

Once the PR knows exactly what kind of lifestyle they are helping their target audience reach, they need to think about where one would eat, sleep, party and repeat to fulfil their ambition of attaining this lifestyle and, how they are going to use these touch-points to tell the story of their brand. After these have been agreed upon, a PR will introduce the most relevant and influential voices to communicate the brand’s core messages and stories.

This is where brand partnerships, brand ambassadors, events and product/ service line extensions come into play. Be it partnering with a like-minded brand, working with a brand ambassador to supporting an activist; the brand is able to enhance the positioning of their own values and beliefs.

When Kate Moss was infamously seen in Hunter wellies at Glastonbury Festival, the product didn’t just get promoted as being useful tool for dealing with mud, but became a symbol of timeless rock n’ roll, a way of life that every festival goer wishes to embody – hence, urging them to buy Hunter wellies.

In 2002 when Patagonia created a non-profit donating 1% of its annual sales to grassroots environmental collectives, they didn’t just do a good deed, they enhanced the brand’s core values of supporting ethical adventure travel, offering their customers an easy route into adopting the purchasing habits of a sustainable individual and a symbol of communicating this to their friends and family.

The lesson to be learnt is always, understand the lifestyle that surrounds your brand and become an integral brand in supporting customers and followers in achieving this desired way of life. Along the way, don’t forget to always listen to what they are saying, observe where they are going and always, make note of who they actually want to listening to.

7

blog_

One pinch me moment after another’ pretty much sums up what it has been like for the Siren team to deliver the PR launch campaign of new cruise ship Celebrity Edge for our client Celebrity Cruises.

And that was just one of the headlines around this spectacular ship thanks to hard work of team Siren.

We are pretty proud of ourselves to deliver media coverage that referred to Celebrity Edge as “the design-led liner”, “nothing short of revolutionary”, “ultra-stylish” and “utterly outstanding”. Frankly we couldn’t have written it better ourselves.

PR for major launches and events doesn’t faze our team. In fact when it comes to launching cruise ships, we have delivered them in nearly double figures. And we’ve calmly steered all kinds of clients through new openings, global press announcements and much much more. But when you are charged with blanket UK media coverage, and the ship showcase will only take place 4,000 miles away across the Atlantic in Florida, it is a bit of challenge.

For Celebrity Edge, the approach was hype, hype and more hype. This was also a PR campaign with one of the longest lead times we’ve ever seen and it carried a real risk of losing momentum and fizzling out long before the ship even launched. Plus, the world and their wife has launched a new ship in 2018 and competition for interest, let alone column inches, was stiff.

But the hype and clear-minded focus on what we collectively wanted to achieve alongside Celebrity Cruises, ensured that our invite list sold itself. Media clambered for the handful of spaces on-board, and when even the Financial Times recognises that “journalists on board are correspondents for Vanity Fair and Tatler, magazines that wouldn’t normally look at a big ship” you know you’re doing something right.

Of course it goes without saying that Celebrity Edge itself did a huge amount of the heavy lifting in exceeding expectations. Celebrity Cruises truly has launched a game-changing ship and it has been an honour to be the PR team to bring this to life. But as anyone in communications knows, great products don’t entirely sell themselves – they need the careful nudge of an award-winning PR team to ensure the media reaction does them justice.

Don’t just take our word for it, take a look here to see more on Celebrity Edge.

And if you want to tap into the PR launch brains at Siren to ensure your brand gets the media attention it deserves, get in touch with the PR agency at the heart of telling the story of Celebrity Edge here.

3

blog_

PR Industry Predictions

PR once operated solely in the realm of earned media. But today, PR firms are managing social media accounts, scoping paid advertising opportunities and touching on content marketing in addition to securing placements in publications and handling other media relations. Although, traditional PR methods still apply and gaining access to media and influencers is vital, there are improvements to be made, to help ensure the industry grows and is future-proofed for generations to come.

Here are just some examples of how the PR industry is changing and what the future will look like:

The value of data

A common misconception about using data in communications is that research and creative storytelling are incompatible. However, data would be completely valueless if we didn’t apply it to our work. Using data-driven research can actually help us better understand our clients and enable targeted storytelling.

Reporting data requires strong storytelling skills and although interpreting data might not be part of our usual creative routine, it is more valuable than ever. Mastering the ability to structure narratives using data is now integral to our work and can help provide clients with new insights into their industries or consumer and business trends, and how their products or services can leverage such trends.

Increase of visual content

People spend more and more time browsing online rather than reading, and when they do read content, only 28% of the words are generally read. To optimise attention, it’s up to us as PR practitioners to ensure appealing and shareworthy content is generated to cater to audiences appetites.

The future demands short, condensed and visually appealing content such as infographics, GIFs and short videos. PR agencies can benefit from careful planning and knowledge of visual content and how to correctly use it, to remain up to date with what is current and potentially viral to appeal to audiences.

PR and marketing working together

The line between PR and marketing is becoming a blur and this is because audiences don’t see a division, they just see the work. This means that PR and marketing teams need to work together and focus on brand building to ensure messaging is consistent and their goals and efforts are aligned.

Brand authority and message delivery can also play a key role in search engine optimisation and digital marketing, which means that PR is becoming more important than ever before.

The scope of opportunities for PR professionals is increasing so we need to continue to adopt forward thinking and accept innovators, such as technology and collaboration in order to remain relevant. At its core PR is still about great storytelling but the future of PR is about creating a shareable experience for all.

9