Social media round up – Supersize your selfies and WayUp!

Is WayUp the way ahead for recruitment?

An online CV is an essential part of any job hunt, but presenting yourself and your achievements to prospective employers in a professional way whilst still sounding like a human can be a tricky balancing act. LinkedIn has the lion’s share of the professional social networking market but there are others who want to disrupt the sector and showcase candidates in a more rounded and personal way, particularly those with fewer roles to include on their CV… enter WayUp.

WayUp has been around for a couple of years now, with a focus on recent graduates and those who have only just entered the workforce, but they’re planning a host of changes to better reflect users. In addition to the standard skills and education sections, the site will allow candidates to showcase their extra-curricular activities and additional skills by integrating Instagram for those with creative and artistic interests, GitHub codes for those more technically savvy, as well as space for demonstrating the full value of volunteer work. WayUp says it is aiming to help candidates better demonstrate their leadership capabilities, whilst showing off who candidates are as a person.

Supersize your selfies

If taking selfies is your passion then a brand new sculpture installation will be right up your street. Thanks to artist Matthew Mohr and his most recent interactive project titled ‘As We Are’, you can now turn your selfie into a work of art with the help of his 14-foot LED sculpture. Following the contours of a stylised head, the artwork displays the faces of those who have interacted with it. All you need to do is enter an integrated photo booth, take a selfie and voila, your face is turned into an impressive museum sculpture.

Project Loon – no it’s not crazy!

Residents in Puerto Rico’s hurricane hit areas are back online thanks to Alphabet’s Project Loon.

Using a series of large balloons, provided by Google’s parent company, the project creates a temporary communication network in areas where there has been significant damage to infrastructure by beaming signals between floating antennae and the ground. This enables mobile phone users to access the web and send messages to one another.

The project is being run with the Puerto Rican government and was also used in Peru after floods earlier this year.

Good evening Europe, this is the internet calling

Poor San Marino, they don’t have much luck in the football, and fair even worse at Eurovision. In eight attempts to get out of the semi-finals, the land-locked microstate has only made it to the Saturday night final once. After the ignominy of finishing last in their semi-final last year with a pretty terrible disco-inspired duet and earning a solitary point, the national broadcaster hinted that 2017’s contest may have been its last. Fear not though, the plucky republic is digging deep for next year’s contest in Lisbon, and they want the internet to find them a champion.

Teaming up with new website 1in360.com, San Marino has sent out a global rallying cry to the world’s musicians to enter the contest as the internet’s candidate. Anyone can enter before 30 November. Entries must achieve 100 likes from website users to be eligible for the next round (or for those with money to burn, pay €4.99), whence a panel of expert judges, apparently including former Eurovision champion Måns Zelmerlöw and (bizarrely) Absolute Radio’s Dave Berry will whittle down the selection to the top 10. They will go head to head in a series of online broadcasts, before the public at large picks their champion.

It remains to be seen if this will change the fortunes of little San Marino. It’s hoped the social aspect of their selection will drum up support and interest ahead of May 2018 to translate into phone votes and a place in the Saturday night spectacular. Anyway, while the Siren band gets busy writing our entry, here’s last year’s disco disaster…

Leave a Reply